<div dir="ltr">Suzanne&#39;s mention of her mother using Eudora via a local ISP who sold pool chemicals out of the same shed as the modem racks has actually given me a direction. Thank you!<div><br></div><div>My first Internet access was dial-up to my employer&#39;s server. Employees were encouraged to do that in 1994 until about 1996 at my company. Employee use skyrocketed and the employer pulled back on serving as an ISP. Fair enough. </div><div><br></div><div>My next access was AOL. I had a local access number, but there were the monthly fees that were actually higher than an independent ISP, although AOL fees did drop dramatically.</div><div><br></div><div>AOL was fairly clunky to use, though, and I did find a local ISP for a reasonable fee (still dial-up!) in 1996. It&#39;s funny - I lived those early days but didn&#39;t think of documenting them for later reference. So I appreciate all of the input. It&#39;s a trip down memory lane for me.</div><div><br></div><div>I suspect it would have been easier to hack a local ISP&#39;s email system, although do let me know if I&#39;m wrong about that! Suzanne makes a valid point that in a husband-wife scenario, the account could be manipulated on-site, but that would take constant vigilance and no guarantee of intercepting the offending email. </div><div><br></div><div>You can all rest assured that I&#39;m not going to try to tackle the technical details of how a hack would happen. </div><div><br></div><div>And I probably should mention that the &quot;other person&quot; lives in Canada, so there are International implications. Did Canada have AOL at the time? I don&#39;t remember. So the independent ISP is probably the way to go.</div><div><br></div><div>I really appreciate the time you all have put into helping me with this point.</div><div><br></div><div>Thanks,</div><div>Linda</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Mar 22, 2015 at 3:25 PM, Suzanne Johnson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:fuhn@pobox.com" target="_blank">fuhn@pobox.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">You are not the only one without an AOL account.  The CDs were<br>
everywhere, but you did need to live close to one of their dial-ups in<br>
order to not incur heavy long distance phone charges for dialing in.  My<br>
mother lived near San Antonio, TX and a call to the closest number was<br>
long distance.  Fortunately, Local ISPs were springing up and helped<br>
folks solve this problem in many parts of the country. My mother was a<br>
happy user of Eudora as her mail program for many years on her local ISP<br>
(who sold pool chemicals out of the same shed housing the the modem racks).<br>
<br>
The other side of it, depending on where the characters lived, would be<br>
the folks who lived near Silicon Valley.  They might be using an early<br>
stage of Metricom&#39;s Ricochet network.<br>
See:  <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricochet_%28Internet_service%29" target="_blank">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricochet_%28Internet_service%29</a><br>
<br>
As for a benevolent hacker who might be able to know how to accomplish<br>
this type of hacking, rather than an IT person, an engineer supporting<br>
an early CSNET installation might be more knowledgeable.    Though given<br>
that we are talking about a husband and wife, it still might be more<br>
likely that one would know, or could guess the other&#39;s password...and<br>
work directly on the account in that way.  This scenario would also<br>
require someone who really knew AOL mail internals from the &#39;94<br>
timeframe to flesh out.<br>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>
   --Suzanne<br>
</font></span><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
<br>
On 3/22/15 10:46 AM, Jack Haverty wrote:<br>
&gt; On 03/20/2015 10:08 AM, Linda Hess wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt; Does anyone on the list know if it would be possible for someone to<br>
&gt;&gt; hack the account and redirect emails to a specific person so they<br>
&gt;&gt; don&#39;t get through?<br>
&gt; Once you allow the existence of a benevolent hacker, almost anything was<br>
&gt; possible.  The hacker could access the mail server system as<br>
&gt; administrator/developer, and do all sorts of mischief.   So the short<br>
&gt; answer is &quot;Yes.&quot;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; The &quot;redirect email for one specific addressee&quot; scenario depends on the<br>
&gt; details of the particular email system.   In the system I built (back in<br>
&gt; the mid 70s) it would have been straightforward to create such behavior.<br>
&gt;    In fact, that system had an annoying tendency to do such things on its<br>
&gt; own, due to the bugs that I never managed to annihilate.   No hacker<br>
&gt; needed...<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Of course, getting into a system as admin/developer probably required a<br>
&gt; bit of work to get a password.  But systems were not always well<br>
&gt; protected in those days - the focus was on just getting them to work at<br>
&gt; all.   Given the stream of news stories about large systems and theft of<br>
&gt; sensitive data, it seems that some systems aren&#39;t well enough protected<br>
&gt; even today.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; You&#39;d have to find someone familiar with the internals of AOL in those<br>
&gt; days to find out how easy it was to hack into AOL back then to do any<br>
&gt; specific mischief.  AOL is probably the most memorable public mail<br>
&gt; service from the early 90s, as they carpeted the planet with CDROMs.<br>
&gt; But they still exist, and might not appreciate the negative publicity.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; I don&#39;t think I ever had an AOL account (am I the only one?), but I had<br>
&gt; a Compuserve account back in the late 80s, as well as an MCIMail account<br>
&gt; (when was that Dave...?)   Also, by then there were commercial spinoffs<br>
&gt; from the NSF Internet efforts, providing service to the public.  One was<br>
&gt; PSI (Performance Systems International), which had a pretty large footprint.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; In addition to black-holing selected email, much other mischief was<br>
&gt; straightforward.  E.G., sending an email which looked like it came from<br>
&gt; someone else, or even intercepting an email, changing its contents, and<br>
&gt; letting it then continue on to the recipient.   Lots of interesting<br>
&gt; story elements there...<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; HTH,<br>
&gt; /Jack Haverty<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; _______________________________________________<br>
&gt; mailhist-discuss mailing list<br>
&gt; <a href="mailto:mailhist-discuss@emailhistory.org">mailhist-discuss@emailhistory.org</a><br>
&gt; <a href="http://emailhistory.org/mailman/listinfo/mailhist-discuss" target="_blank">http://emailhistory.org/mailman/listinfo/mailhist-discuss</a><br>
&gt;<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
mailhist-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:mailhist-discuss@emailhistory.org">mailhist-discuss@emailhistory.org</a><br>
<a href="http://emailhistory.org/mailman/listinfo/mailhist-discuss" target="_blank">http://emailhistory.org/mailman/listinfo/mailhist-discuss</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>