<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
     My $.02<br>
    <br>
    On 6/7/2012 11:06 AM, Terry Gray wrote:
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAKGV=1T567OES7qAzoEH3RnK+6DKCD7t19-od9hgYuGce=VxBQ@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <meta http-equiv="Context-Type" content="text/html;
        charset=ISO-8859-1">
      slight mod, v2:
      <div><br>
      </div>
      <div>Electronic mail (Email) is a service provided by computer
        programs to send  messages from the user of one computer account
        to the personal mailbox(es) of others for later retrieval.  An
        electronic mail message consists of packaged data, analogous to
        a physical letter, specifying one or more authors and one or
        more recipients.<br>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    Getting close...<br>
    <br>
    Perhaps "computer account" is not relevant. There are accounts
    involved, but they are a mechanism for identifying a user and his
    mailbox and a basis for providing privacy. A computer with no login
    required and an array of mailboxes named by their respective users
    would work just fine. There would be no computer account. There
    would also be no protection, but I think it would still qualify as
    email.<br>
    <br>
    Maybe we can find a better phrase than "packaged data", too.<br>
    <br>
    Early versions of email (CTSS, SNDMSG) did not identify the
    recipient; if the message was in your mailbox you were a recipient.<br>
    <br>
    I think a slightly reworded version of the first sentence above
    captures the essence of email. <br>
    <br>
    Electronic mail (Email) is a service that allows a computer user to
    send messages to the mailboxes of other computer users for later
    reading.<br>
    <br>
    Anything beyond that needs a justification. Even "computer user" is
    open to misinterpretation. It implies a person using a computer, but
    allows Amazon to automatically send order status messages if you
    think the daemon that does the sending is a computer user. The
    nature of the message is a particularly slippery slope; almost any
    statement here will have numerous exceptions. Is it text? No. Are
    the recipients named? Not in early versions where no routing was
    involved. Is the sender named? Again, not in early versions and not
    in spam.<br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>