<!doctype html public "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
<html><head><style type="text/css"><!--
blockquote, dl, ul, ol, li { padding-top: 0 ; padding-bottom: 0 }
 --></style><title>Re: [mailhist-discuss] Ayyadurai on Emily Rooney's
WGBH sh</title></head><body>
<blockquote type="cite" cite><br></blockquote>
<blockquote type="cite" cite>Ayyadurai has persuaded another WGBH
journalist that he invented email and "holds the copyright on it."
Emily Rooney, 5/17/2012, "Conquering Digital
Clutter."</blockquote>
<blockquote type="cite" cite>&nbsp;</blockquote>
<blockquote type="cite" cite><a
href=
"http://www.wgbh.org/programs/The-Emily-Rooney-Show-854/episodes/Thurs-51712Conquering-Digital-Clutter-38713"><br>
</a></blockquote>
<div><br></div>
<div>Does anyone recall for which&nbsp; computer Ayyadurai coded his
copyrighted material?</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>DCRT/NIH was distributing a Tops-10 (not Tenex) email system in
the mid-late 70s.&nbsp; I believe it was developed at NIH for use on
their Tops-10 system that was not connected to the Arpanet at that
time.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Intel obtained a copy of the distribution tape in early 1978.&nbsp;
It installed easily and was very stable on our&nbsp; standard Tops-10
systems.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>I can not find reference to this software in online DCRT/NIH
histories, but I absolutely know it existed and was distributed to
anyone who requested it.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>I do wonder whether the Medical/Dental college at which&nbsp;
Ayyadurai did his work might have had any NIH grants, or perhaps had
access to the DCRT computer.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Also, BBN-Prophet was established and operational from the late
60'w/early 70s.&nbsp; I'm quite sure it had email functionality.&nbsp;
Users were MDs and scientists working on aspects of drug trials.&nbsp;
Same question here as to whether there were Prophet users at&nbsp;
school where Ayyadurai did his email work.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>&nbsp; --Suzanne</div>
<div><br></div>
</body>
</html>